medical geography

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medical geography

The study of disease patterns as influenced by regional or global climate, microbiology, pollution, or other environmental factors; the relationship between the health of populations and the places in which they live.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

medical geography

The relationship between geographic factors and disease. With the growth of world travel, medical geography has assumed ever-increasing importance in the contexts of both public health and research.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive?
Liverpool senior lecturer in Health Geography, Dr Mark Green, who undertook the study, said: "The statistics reveal important insights about the concentration of certain amenities that may be damaging or promote health.
Liverpool senior lecturer in health geography Dr Mark Green, who undertook the study, said: "The statistics reveal important insights about the concentration of certain amenities that may be damaging or promote health.
Regarding health geography in England, significant differences were present for the combined car, bus, and walking GP accessibility (CUMULATIVE) on all three levels (p<.001): On the NHS Commissioning Region level (n = 4), London had the highest GP accessibility (13.3) and South of England the lowest (7.2).
Author Clare Bambra teaches public health geography and directs the Centre for Health and Inequalities Research at Durham University.
Within the literature, many health geography studies use spatial methods, temporal methods, and less commonly spatio-temporal methods.
DAVENHALL, B., (2002), Health Geography, online at: www.esri.com/news/arcuser/0702/overview.html
There are also discussions about budgets, how to start or expand library collections in this area, and whether the field should remain "medical geography" or be called "health geography."
Chapter 1 defines the scope of health geography, introduces the theories and presents basic assumptions and philosophies underlying much of the research presented in this book.
Recent theory and research--especially that coming out of the fields of social work, mental health geography, and psychiatric epidemiology--reveals critical dimensions involving the assessment and intervention on the macro and micro levels of practice.
In particular, it provides analytical tools for health geography and epidemiological research in cases where geographical display is important.
During the 1990s, a rupture occurred that left medical geography on one side and health geography on the other.
The influences of postmodernism, post-structuralism, the cultural turn and the 'performative movement' have resulted in what is known in the public relations world as re-branding--the new cultural geography, new critical urban geography, new medical geography or health geography, and third wave and post-feminisms.

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